At Leeds At Birmingham At Reading

Mark Taylor-BattyDr Mark Taylor-Batty
Principal Investigator

Mark is an internationally recognised expert in the field of Pinter scholarship. He is the author of three books on Harold Pinter’s work, holds an executive role in the International Harold Pinter Society, and participated in advising Harold Pinter on – as well as assisting to construct – the web-site devoted to his work (http://www.haroldpinter.org/).

View Mark’s University of Leeds page


Basil ChiassonDr Basil Chiasson
Research Fellow

Basil researches on Harold Pinter and contemporary British drama and performance. He has contributed to The Theatre of Harold Pinter, Modern Drama, The Pinter Review and Harold Pinter’s The Dumb Waiter. He has authored one book, The Late Harold Pinter: Political Dramatist, Poet and Activist, which will be published later this year. This study employs affect theory to refine and develop existing definitions of what makes Pinter’s work political. It is the first book-length study of Pinter’s later political dramas, poetry and activism. Basil also has research interests on how neoliberalism and austerity politics come to bear upon the dramatic arts. Prior to joining the Harold Pinter: Histories and Legacies team Basil taught in Theatre Studies and English programmes on the history of theatre, modern drama and contemporary British theatre and performance.

Graham SaundersProfessor Graham Saunders
Co-investigator

Graham is an internationally recognised authority on post-war British theatre and has experience working on archival holdings related to two major AHRC projects on the work of the Arts Council of Great Britain and the reception of Samuel Beckett in the UK & Ireland.

View Graham’s University of Birmingham page


Catriona FallowDr Catriona Fallow
Research Fellow

Before joining the Harold Pinter: Histories and Legacies project, Catriona worked as a Teaching Fellow at the in the Department of Drama and Theatre Arts at the University of Birmingham. Broadly, her research specialises in contemporary British and European playwriting, theatre history, historiography and archival studies, and contemporary Shakespearean performance. She recently completed her PhD at Queen Mary University of London where she also worked as a Teaching Associate. Catriona’s work has been published in Studies in Theatre and Performance, and has been presented internationally at Harvard’s Mellon School for Theatre and Performance Research, Performance Studies International, and the International Federation for Theatre Research.

View Catriona’s University of Birmingham page

Jonathan BignellProfessor Jonathan Bignell
Co-investigator

Jonathan has led funded research on five previous AHRC collaborative grants in television historiography and has studied British television drama with extensive use of archive sources, also working with media industry professionals. His leadership roles include Trusteeship of Reading’s world-leading Beckett archive and networks specializing in research into media history.

View Jonathan’s University of Reading page


Amanda WrigleyDr Amanda Wrigley
Postdoctoral researcher

Before joining the AHRC-funded Pinter project, Amanda was Mid-Career Research Fellow in the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research (2016-17) and Research Fellow on the AHRC-funded ‘Screen Plays: Theatre Plays on British Television’ project and its impact at the University of Westminster (2011-2017). Dr Wrigley is interested in 20th-century British radio and television engagements with theatre plays (especially ancient Greek) and with humanities topics more broadly as educational programming for schools and the Open University; she also works on BBC Radio features by literary figures such as Louis MacNeice and Dylan Thomas.

View Amanda’s web pages


Billy SmartDr Billy Smart
Postdoctoral researcher

Billy previously worked as Research Officer on ‘Forgotten British Television Drama, 1946-82’ at Royal Holloway (2013-17) and ‘Spaces of Television: Production, Site and Style’ at Reading (2010-13). Work has included studies of the development of Scottish and Welsh television drama, TV representations of lesbianism in 1970s drama, dramas made on Outside Broadcast, the work of the BBC Audience Research Unit, the changing visual form of soap opera and how the theatrical conventions of Shakespeare, Ibsen, Chekhov, Brecht and J.B. Priestley were altered by studio practice when adapted for television.